Book Review of ‘Raising Hell – The Short and Sweet Version’ (Julie Ferwerda, 2016)

As a lifelong Christian who has always critiqued and pondered deeply the core teachings of both Christianity and religions in general, David Sretenovic has a particular interest in the doctrine of Eternal Conscious Torment in Hell. In this blog he reviews a brilliant book by Julie Ferwerda, ‘Raising Hell – The Short and Sweet Version’ (2016, Vagabond Group).

Years after I read and was blessed by Raising Hell (2011) (the earlier edition to the subject of this review) I had the pleasure of meeting and hanging out with its author, Julie Ferwerda. This struck me about her: she loves and cares for people, and she is honest. And this is the wonderfully human sense you get as you read the book. In particular, the autobiographical elements show her internal, personal dialogue as she followed her conscience – prodded by the innocent questioning of her young daughter – into examining the way the traditional doctrine of ‘eternal hell’ seems incongruent with the heart of a loving Father God. The image of the Prodigal Son’s father frenziedly running to greet his returning vagabond is a refrain throughout Raising Hell – The Short and Sweet Version (2016) (Raising Hell (TSSV)) . This will capture your heart and intellect if you let it.

Any reader who opens their heart enough to feel the compassion behind the book will be blessed to encounter the rigour and logic which Ferwerda applies in deconstructing the centuries-old edifice of children-parents-and-friends-torturously-burning-in-hell-while-we-are-happily-coexisting-in-heaven-forever. Raising Hell (TSSV) is a welcome précis to the original book, yet its scope remains balanced and thorough. Ferwerda draws on robust scholarship, including the Jewish and Universalist traditions, and amply utilizes both classical and modern analogies, timeless quotes, poetry and biblical worldviews to unlock the paradigm. Much of the book is also dedicated to rebutting common pro-hell arguments, including the “What about Hitler?” quip!

Ferwerda scaffolds her thesis throughout by supplying the important questions which she, and any searching reader, need to ask to distill the truth on the matter. Questions such as: Doesn’t the New Testament mention hell more often than heaven? Is there a viable Christian theological position historically and scripturally that doesn’t teach a literal, eternal hell? How could millions of devout Christians and theologians over many centuries have been duped (and who am I to question authoritative scholarship)? Moreover, the author delves into the intricacies of Bible translation through the ages and interpretation. The chapters explore these well, and Bible study and discussion-starting scaffolding are also supplied (although fewer than in the first edition of the book).

The following quotes from Raising Hell (TSSV) are most illuminating for anyone who is warming to the idea of ‘raising hell’, and wanting to be shepherded towards a better hope, as the gospel suggests:

The notion of hell is suspiciously missing from the OT as the destiny for most of mankind, unless you read the KJV or TM (The Message), both of which include the word hell over thirty times. Do KJV and TM know something others don’t? Why the inconsistency?…Here’s the deal. KJV translates Sheol as hell whenever they want to convey it as the fearsome destination of the wicked (e.g. Ps. 55:15, 91:17…). However, when portraying the fate of the righteous, they translate it grave (e.g. Ps. 89:48, Job 14:13). Same exact Hebrew word in both cases!…

The word most often translated hell in the NT is the word Gehenna, found only twelve times – once in James and the rest occurring in the Gospels. Jesus warned about Gehenna on four unique occasions in Matthew. Mark and Luke only use it in one passage (repeating Matthew), and John doesn’t use it all. (Raising Hell (TSSV), p.26-27).

It makes you think, doesn’t it?

For more information and a link to a free download of the Hell Raising books, click on this link: http://www.raisinghellbook.com/#wrap . Follow the book and Julie Ferwerda on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RaisingHellBook/ .

Additional resources on the general topic of “hell” via my public Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Hell-free-Christianity-203963783004656/

A Good Shepherd; More Than Sheep

Ever looked back at a time when you were a bit of a “sheep”? Ever been mistreated by an authority figure? David Sretenovic shares a meme and a thought on that plight of humanity: to be shepherded.

memekraftsheepcrook(Meme by MemekraftDS, 19/02/17)

I got to thinking this week…

We’re all sheep in a sense, but there is an awakening process. I also think there are different types of shepherds out there. I think of pastoral figures, but also authorities across society, from politicians and doctors to teachers and parents. There’s a fine line to walk. A shepherd has a privilege and responsibility to nurture humanity but not clutch at control.

John 10:11 is also gold.

Peace on your journey!

— David

Free to Reject (spoken word poem)

“The ultimate in unconditional, gospel love… at least that’s my goal.” In this spoken-word poem, David Sretenovic expresses his vision and faith for life and life after death: hope for all, bar NONE. (Video and lyrics only)

Free to Reject (spoken word poem)

By David Sretenovic — November, 2016

You are free to reject this; That’s what makes it the gospel; I won’t use coercion, pure and simple; There can be no threat, if agape is in use; and risk can’t exist if omniscience and love fuse; To me the gospel’s simple: it’s unconditional love; selfless and pure, guaranteed from Above; And here’s the kicker: there’s no catch to it; You can give Christ the finger; And tell God to shove it; You’re free to curse Him; You’re free to hate; go ahead and murder Him; I’ve done worse to date; And you’re free to oppose me; You’re free to prove me wrong; if enemies abuse me, gospel love echoes-on; Attack the church; join a cult; change your gender; what’s the result?; Nothing changes from God’s POV; The gospel embraces every single body; Because God sees it coming; And technically you can’t bother; The king on his throne; Who’s got your back like a brother//

For me the Good News is that heaven is for all; Otherwise, it can’t be heaven at all; That’s the beauty of the Christian game; We all came from love and our destination is the same; If God is truly able to do as He desires; Couldn’t he choose to quench Hell’s fires?; Sure I’m not God, I can’t see beyond the grave; but I’m just not inspired unless all are saved//

Think for a moment what has captured the human mind; the most divine images your heart can find; The purity of a child; The nurture of a mother; a wild west sunset; The climax of a lover; Reading that love letter; tasting a vintage wine; memories from that picture; a symphony sublime; The love of a dog; or a campfire moment; finding a galaxy; oooh that perfume scent; Perfect geometry; sculptures of Rodin; surfing Oahu’s wave; holding her hand; Your head on his shoulder; dancing slow; That desert rose; the orchid in the snow; These are all a taste of a heaven guarantee; our souls are meant for a garden of ecstasy; This is the hope I have to share; the gospel of Christ takes us all there; And you’re free to reject it; That’s what makes it the gospel; who needs coercion? Not Christ in the Bible; The truth is that love is everywhere and nothing is at stake for a perfect God of care

Ye Shall Know the Truth and it Shall Frustrate the Bleeding Life out of You

In this blog, David Sretenovic takes the reader to that fork in the road where, in daily routines, you have a choice as to which truth to speak. Captain Obvious swoops in like Superman to do his thing too.

“Well, thank-you, Captain Obvious!” Have you ever heard someone say that? It’s said with a double dose of sarcasm, sometimes in jest but other times with spiteful disdain. (If you haven’t come across this colloquialism, it’s directed at someone who has made an unhelpful and unnecessary observation about something which is plainly clear to all present.) Sometimes it amounts to being told, “Make yourself useful for a change, would you?”

I had a funny thought though (go with me for a second):  isn’t Captain Obvious telling the truth? Doesn’t the “truth set you free” (according to the popular, biblical maxim)? Soooo, if Captain Obvious were a Superhero, then telling the truth would be his super-power… that would make him the greatest liberator of all the Superheros! I’m being silly of course, but to be honest I know people – often religious, preachy folk – who actually think that that’s the way it works. Unfortunately it’s not: simply stating something which is true doesn’t miraculously liberate someone. Moreover, it seems to be a largely unappreciated reality that some truths are simply not worth stating. In fact, in any given circumstance, there are always multiple truths on offer (and you can’t say them all!). Developing my perspective here, I’d like to point to two of the more important truths which present themselves in any given circumstance, one of them being pertinent particularly for the Christian Believer.

I face the choice over and over – and marriage circumstances, particularly arguments with Wifey, spring to mind – as to which truth to speak, to harness, to thrust into our discourse. Something has gone wrong in the home: perhaps a child was disappointed because their favourite pyjamas were unwashed for bedtime; perhaps dinner preparation was left too late and the whole zoo rioted – and I am locking horns with her. I know I am right, and I can retell the story for her, stating each excruciating fact, exactly as it happened. In brutal prosecutor fashion, I could piece together the machinery of her failure so no judge or jury could deny my case. (As an aside, I’ll point out that such an approach, brimming with factuality and truth, tends to have to the objective of putting the blame onto her and off me). But, as a Believer who is possessed by the Holy Ghost, I always have another truth ringing in my ear. “Your wife,” He says, “is a Queen, a gift to you, blameless before Me, and achieving exactly what I have intended for her in life, and in your marriage. She is a holy saint, made exquisitely and perfectly, for you and for Me, and her words right now are emissaries from my throne. I, your God, am speaking to you, David, through her! She is Love to you, right now! And what she did in causing this present disappointment looks to you like a habit and a character flaw which you cannot justify or overlook, but this is not her true character; her true character, in Christ, is peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness and self-control… just as the Bible says.” For me, in that moment of heated quarrel, both of these are absolute truths. And at that instance, I can only choose to say one of them. The question is: which one is more helpful? To make this point more generalised: in any situation, you can either state the observable truths, or the gospel-driven, spiritual perspective. 

What I believe is a great challenge of life, and indeed a blaring reason for our need for God and the Holy Spirit, is to be able to make the right choice of which truth to be uttering at the right time. And this is my exhortation: choose the best truth you can at every given moment! Choose the best truth that YOU can see! There is no moral obligation or coercion (on pain of post-life culpability before the Great Judge, as some imagine it) to take one or the other, just simply choose that one which is your best and dearest! Choose it now! Choose it later! Choose it every day, for every person, in every circumstance! Choose the best truth you know, and speak it. 

And THAT, my friend.

THAT will set you free.

Peace.

Stepping Stones for Andje

David Sretenovic shares a poem inspired by time with his daughter, and reflects on the stepping stones of her growth into his family faith.

Earlier in the week I captured a special moment with my daughter Andje [AHN-jee], who is now three and a half years of age, in a poem. The picture attached is similar to the view I had as she sat on my lap outside 🙂 .

Rain, Snuggles and Tears

You sit on my lap wrapped in your special blanket
We breathe the rain-soaked air and feel the fresh breeze
You snuggle up and smile because you just love to
I hear your voice uttering unfiltered delights
You describe the world around and the world inside your heart
Every idea is magic to me
And just as I see the lines of your pure little cheeks
I see that you will need me to teach you as you grow
But if I am gone before that time
I know God will
The tears they come and fill my heart like the rain
Tears of joy for you, my beautiful daughter

This week has in fact been special: I’ve seen my daughter grow in beautiful ways. Little milestones of independence such as dressing herself and cleaning up spontaneously, next-level manners, and for the first time actively clarifying alphabet letters for her name and others’. And today as we were reading some kids Bible stories, she consciously engaged as never before with the events of Christmas and Jesus’ life story: I saw pennies dropping like a poker machine payout. It was a precious moment, because images from Christmas, Easter, and other New Testament events are so dear to our psyche as a family and our extended Christian community. She was partaking of our faith in a new way. These are moments I’ve been anticipating with joy: sharing with her the hope which the gospel gives to us and the whole universe — and not just potential hope, as some factions of Christendom offer, to “the elect” or to “those who say the correct prayer”. It was a thrill for me to share with her our faith, and to inspire a hope-filled outlook as she faces both life today and also the sadness of death. I was amazed at the hope I heard in my own voice – it was real! By telling her what I believe, my heart and voice communicated hope. And in time, because I have shared my faith, she too will have an opportunity to believe what I do … but regardless of her future choices, I believe I have already instilled a sense of hope into her spirit, something beyond words and intellectual understanding. I do believe this.

What joy my daughter brings. Thank you, Heavenly Father!

Expletive Dirty Gospel (a poem by David Sretenovic)

“Expletive Dirty Gospel” — a poem expressing David Sretenovic’s take on good and evil. [Video and lyrics only].

The gospel is the best thing I know, full stop. It inspires art because art has that divine quality which allows us to convey the spiritual realities we experience via faith. Here’s a poem which explains my way of making sense of this crazy world, and the optimism which Christ has birthed in me. It’s called Expletive Dirty Gospel [Video link and lyrics below].

Peace

David Sretenovic

Expletive Dirty Gospel (a poem)

I could use an expletive to portray my emotion; And you can bet your ass I will on the right occasion; It’s really not my style but I do sense the freedom; in my cut-loose religion of personal validation; Not the type of faith that is sans the supernatural; just a set of righteous rules, plus a heavy hymnal; Of course that’s cool if you worship that way; But let me shine a little light on how my gospel brothers pray; Our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; And now we art on earth because artistry is your game

I’ve discovered the craft of prayer; no longer asking “Which craft?”; since sailing to safety on my prayer-life raft; It’s the crafting of stillness; where you become the clay; which cannot tell the potter how to mold it today; It’s the craft of learning who and what we are; those two raw elements, earth and water; No wonder I sometimes get bogged in the miry clay; I’m formed from mud and will return one day; It’s a murky mess which mirrors my soul; a soily personality part good part evil

When God shaped man from the dust of the earth; he was the very first potter at work; And this divine artist truly knew his trade; a creature capable of care and corruption he made; Good and evil, water and sand; why oh why – I didn’t understand; Until I stopped, and took his hand; And he opened my eyes to what he had planned; “Dust and water,” He said, “You are”; “so both good and evil you will discover, But only one will win in the end; no angel or man can stop what I intend; All will be as I planned it would; Otherwise I lied when I said ‘It is good.’”

—By David Sretenovic, November 2016